Programs for Academic Student Support (PASS) Receives More than $3 Million in Federal Grant Funding

Published: September 11, 2015

Programs for Academic Student Support (PASS) Receives More than $3 Million in Federal Grant Funding

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – Programs for Academic Student Support (PASS) at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi received funding from the U.S. Department of Education totaling $3,437,690 over a five-year period, for three different Student Support Service (SSS) grants.

The money is part of a $270 million award to 968 institutions of higher education. The funding will provide thousands of students with academic and other support services they need to succeed in college. These services include individualized counseling, career guidance, exposure to cultural events and mentoring.

“It is very exciting for the SSS staff to have the opportunity to provide the additional services for Islander students that will increase student retention and graduation,” said Dr. Patricia Spaniol-Mathews, Executive Director for PASS, SSS, SOAR, McNair Scholars program, and the First in the World program. “The greatest pleasure for students and staff is graduation day. This day is full of pride and accomplishment for all involved. This is the path to a bright future.”

The first grant, which will support the general SSS program, is valued at $247,538 every year for a five-year cycle. It will provide academic support services for 160 low-income, first-generation and/or disabled students. This new grant replaces the current SSS grant.

The second grant, which will support science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and health science, is valued at $220,000 every year for a five-year cycle. It will provide services for 120 low-income, first-generation students or individuals with disabilities pursing disciplines in STEM, including hands-on workshops, technological innovations, scientific research, biotechnology, electronics, communications and health research.

The third grant, which will support teacher preparation in grades kindergarten through 12th grade, is valued at $220,000 every year for a five-year cycle. It will provide services for 140 low-income, first-generation students or individuals with disabilities pursuing disciplines in the following areas, as well as other related fields: test preparation to meet the teaching credential for certification and license; internships to learn effective teaching practices; mentoring to experience on-the-job training and technology, to enable integration of technology into classroom instruction. The funding will also support diversity training, to meet the needs of students; methodology to increase the level of implementation of student performance assessment techniques, as well as implementing state and district curriculum and performance standards; and teaching practices to affect special behavior problems.

Each grant went into effect on September 1, 2015.